Two Christmas Card Tips

In my last blog post I showed you my first ten Christmas cards, created with two so-called card art stencils.

This week I have two extra tips for all of you who are preparing to get your craft on and make your own Christmas cards for this year:

  1. Combine leftover die-cuts & cutaparts from one collection, with papers from a fairly neutral collection. Like in my case, the 6×12″ Wood Texture paper block by Joy Crafts;
  2. Create a large card, e.g. A5-sized, and create elaborate layouts without it getting to ‘busy’ to look at.

There’s actually a third tip hidden inside the video, namely to use what I have dubbed scrap mats, in other words: meticulously paper-pieced background mats. Check out my free video tutorial on how to make them – you’ll get a lot more paper real estate from your leftover papers!

 

Ten Scandinavian-styled Christmas Cards (with French Christmas wishes)

Recently I decided to experiment with Dutch Doobadoo’s card art stencils, which you use by simply tracing around their various edges to two nested shapes. So I bought two of the stencils and created ten (early) Christmas cards, using a cherry red cardstock as a base.

I decorated with the Warm Winter Wishes paper collection by Marianne Design and die-cuts from the wonderfully cosy-looking Scandinavian Winter collection by Studiolight. In the video below I show you all ten cards, all of them sporting “Joyeux Noël” as a die-cut sentiment – a.k.a. Merry Christmas in French.

I really enjoyed working with these stencils, their ‘fun factor’ definitely exceeded my expectations. Plus I found them a very useful alternative for a die-cutting machine, so they are perfect to take with you to places where you know you won’t have access to any die-cutting tools (like when I go to my mom’s 😉 ).

So enjoy the end result and let me know if you have any experience with these or other card art stencils! 🙋🏻